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was also inducted into the hall of heroes at the pentagon and honored with a parade. since then meyer has raised more than a million dollars to help send the children of wounded marines to college. and finally, as you have all seen, he is the author of "into the fire: a firsthand account of the most extraordinary battle in the afghan war." leading authorities is very proud to exclusively represent dakota meyer, and now i want to show you a video to hear more about dakota and his story. thank you. ♪ >> it's kind of frustrating because, you know, everyone wants to get an interview about the worst day of your life. >> it was a straightforward mission that then-21-year-old sergeant dakota meyer had been assigned that day. meyer waited anxiously by the vehicles as his team began their parol of the village on foot. as they approached, all hell l broke loose. more than 50 insurgents fired from positions on mountains surrounding the valley and from within the village. back at the vehicles, meyer heard the firing and could see into the valley. the volume of fire increased, and the radio traffic
deal logical issue this is about safety and efficiency. the pentagon is behind the reductions. you want a smaller nuclear arsenal that you can be confident will work. >> countries okay you off. countries with the bomb. the u.s., russia, britain, france, china, india, pakistan, israel, north korea. countries believed to be seeking the bomb, iran,ee p egypt, nigeria, syria, taiwan. officially given up to pssing or developing the bomb, south africa, argentina, brazil, kazakhstan, belarus, ukraine, libya. >> you want to correct that buchanan? >> i don't think there are any active programs in any of those countries you are talking about except possibly iran. i don't think egypt, i don't think they have nuclear programs at all. and south africa gave up an actual nuclear weapon. libya gave up what they had inside that mountain which juan working that well. >> do you want to speak to anything? particularly iran? >> iran is going to be i just came back from the middle east, iran is going to be the issue for that part of the world. nobody is comfortable with what iran is doing at this stage of t
, if it goes into effect it's going to stay into effect. it will result in loss of jobs. the pentagon, i think last week, said that they were going to lay off 46,000 temporary workers and furlough civilian workers for a day a week for 22 weeks. this is not without effect on real people. the people who want the sequester to go into effect for a while, republicans who say, we'll deal with it, they want to hear complaints from constituents. they want pressure to be put on lawmakers to get their act together. i don't flow if that will work. because it hasn't worked so far. that's the hope. >> so far. eventually perhaps washington will get back to doing it the way it's supposed to be done. the president calling for a temporary fix. thank you r joining us. gloria borger, back in washington. as i turn things over to suzanne malveaux in atlanta. i love the language the president use, modest reforms, that means cuts in social programs, he's willing to do that in exchange for modest tax reforms, he means increases. language always interesting. tell us what's coming ahead. >> appearing reasonable and he'
've seen two budget-related announcements coming out of the pentagon. one, i was looking up just now because i was trying to remember the numbers, and that is that the pentagon is beefing up its cybersecurity force, taking it from 900 to 4,000 and putting a few billion dollars into it. the other one that is apparently being beefed up in these times of budgetary constraints are the special forces. tom, would you just talk about that generally and then, fred, if you would talk about that not just in afghanistan, but in the broader battle and the nature of it, and then we'll come over to publish shah and the non-- membership shah and the nonexistent challenge that faces us in asia. [laughter] >> i'll try to be brief, dani. look, these new capabilities, you know, cyber operations or whatever you want to call them are certainly necessary and needed, and our ability to exploit, you know, the electromagnetic spectrum configured as the internet is, you know, pretty critical. but it's not qualitatively different from other forms of intelligence gathering or, you know, attempts to either by pr
and commented on the pentagon lifting of the ban on women in the front lines of combat. one of the speakers was the first female pilot to fly in combat. here's a little of what she had to say. >> sitting in a squatter officer school, i was getting ready to go to fighter training, i just completed the triathlon, a bunch of injured 3, special forces, i take to their -- kicked their butts, and you had guys saying, "women don't have the endurance to do, admissions." you want to go outside and talk about this? [laughter] let's go for a run. the difficulty and the reason -- and seeing it even in the debates that are going on even though the train has left the station, a lot of people who are against this thing get away with you have been excluded from doing this, you have not done it, i have done it, therefore you cannot do it. i don't know if you have seen the nuances on tv lately. sure, you have been in combat and engaged with the enemy anbut that is the different from sustained operations. that is the language you are hearing, on fox, and it might. [laughter] -- fox, anyway. [laughter] justin
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)